Are There Any Curse Words in Japanese? Why Japanese Don’t Swear?

      2017/03/08

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When you learn ANY language, many of you must have wondered “how to swear in that language.” Wanna know how to swear in Japanese? Read this and you will be surprised!

 

 

 

Is There Any F word in Japanese?

 

Canadians would ask me “hey, how do you say F**k in Japanese?”

My answer is “…..hmmm… I don’t know.”

 

I don’t know because I don’t swear in Japanese!!

 

ANY language has some sort of curse words and language-learners are curious how to insult in that language.

 

Even if one cannot speak proper English, for instance, he knows (usually he) how to say the F word and something like Sh*t.

 

Japanese is quite different from other language in terms of curse language. There are curse words in Japanese but they are weaker compared to foreign language.

 

For instance, when I think of curse words some words come up to my mind: those include baka (stupid), kuso (sh*t), something like that.

But compared to English, those are not powerful. It’s not definitely the F word.

 

Therefore, my conclusion would be “Yes, there are some sort of curse words in Japanese, but they are not as powerful as the F word.”

 

The question comes up to your mind would be, then, “How come Japanese curse words are not that strong?”

 

 

 

3 Reasons Why Japanese are Less Likely to Swear

First of all I have to state that “Japanese swear.”

Yes, some of them do. They would use different curse words. In general, however, Japanese don’t swear a lot.

Below are possible 3 reasons why Japanese are less likely to swear and use not-that-strong curse words when needed.

 

 

Never Colonized

One of the reasons why Japanese don’t swear often is because Japan was never colonized.

What does it mean?

 

Colonization controls culture, language and the way people live in countries. The feeling of hatred and despair would be produced.

 

Because Japan was never colonized by other countries, they don’t swear.

They didn’t have to swear. They didn’t have strong feeling of hatred and despair towards others.

They didn’t need to have strong curse words because they didn’t need to use.

 

 

 

Talk Behind One’s Back

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Another reason why Japanese don’t insult is because they would talk behind someone’s back. Sneaky!

 

Even when they are angry, they might not insult in front of colleagues, for instance. They, however, might talk behind one’s back. They don’t swear in front of others, but they would complain when the person is absent.

In a sense, it’s worse than swearing because one doesn’t know if they talk behind her/his back.

 

 

Patience is Beauty

You sometimes want to swear because something went wrong, you make a mistake, someone is mean to u, or just feel annoyed.

 

Whatever the reason, most people express their anger and swear.

However, in Japanese culture, patience is considered as beauty.

Patience is necessary in Japanese culture. That’s why many Japanese work long hours without swearing at their bosses (they are likely to talk behind boss’ back though).

Customer service rep usually don’t argue with customers (some exceptions might apply).

To sum up, Japanese are patient and they try not to swear.

 

 

Summary

When you learn language, you are also learning culture of that language.

I love learning language because it’s interesting. Learning English made me realize that English speakers and Japanese speakers think in a different way.

 

Some people want to learn curse language because they are curious. Some people want to know curse words because they can use when arguing.

Why do you want to learn curse words?

 

 

 

Also these posts touch mysterious Japanese culture:
Do you think Japanese is polite? → Is Japanese Polite or Fake?

Here are 2 things can be seen in Japan →2 Bizarre Facts You Want to Know About Japan

 

 

 

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